Posts Tagged ‘stop driving’

Getting a person with Alzheimer’s to stop driving

Sunday, September 9th, 2012

Getting a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease to stop driving is one of the most difficult tasks you will ever have to accomplish.

Clear Signs that the Person Should Stop Driving: Although there are many signs that a person should stop driving, the Alzheimer’s Association lists five primary ones:

  1. Forgetting how to locate familiar places
  2. Failing to observe traffic signs
  3. Making slow or poor decisions in traffic
  4. Driving at an inappropriate speed
  5. Becoming angry or confused while driving

Six Tips for Getting the Person to Stop Driving:

  1. Have their primary care provider or attorney talk to them.
  2. Have another family member or friend they respect talk to them.
  3. Take away the car keys
  4. Mechanically disable the car.
  5. Park the car around the corner or elsewhere out of their site.
  6. Report them to the state Department (or Bureau) of Motor Vehicles, which in most states will make them take a driving test. If they fail, their license will be revoked.

When they stop driving you will, of course, need to arrange transportation for them. You can do this through a combination of driving them yourself, arranging for others to drive them, and having them use taxis, buses, senior transportation services, delivery services, etc.

Getting your loved one with Alzheimer’s to stop driving will not be a simple task, but remember – it’s your responsibility to get him or her out from behind the wheel before someone gets hurt.

 

Tips for Getting Your Loved One With Alzheimer’s to Stop Driving Before It’s Too Late

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

Getting a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease to stop driving is one of the most difficult tasks you will ever have to accomplish.

Clear Signs that the Person Should Stop Driving:  Although there are many signs that a person should stop driving, the Alzheimer’s Association lists five primary ones:

  1. Forgetting how to locate familiar places
  2. Failing to observe traffic signs
  3. Making slow or poor decisions in traffic
  4. Driving at an inappropriate speed
  5. Becoming angry or confused while driving

Six Tips for Getting the Person to Stop Driving:

  1. Have their primary care provider or attorney talk to them.
  2. Have another family member or friend they respect talk to them.
  3. Take away the car keys
  4. Mechanically disable the car.
  5. Park the car around the corner or elsewhere out of their site.
  6. Report them to the state Department (or Bureau) of Motor Vehicles, which in most states will make them take a driving test. If they fail, their license will be revoked.

When they stop driving you will, of course, need to arrange transportation for them. You can do this through a combination of driving them yourself, arranging for others to drive them, and having them use taxis, buses, senior transportation services, delivery services, etc.

Getting your loved one with Alzheimer’s to stop driving will not be a simple task, but remember – it’s your responsibility to get him or her out from behind the wheel before someone gets hurt.