Posts Tagged ‘get help’

15 Tips for Surviving as an Alzheimer’s Caregiver

Friday, December 19th, 2014
  1. Become an educated caregiver: Some useful sites for educating yourself are the Alzheimer’s Association and the Alzheimer’s Reading Room. Also, attend any caregiving seminars presented in your community.
  2. Ask for help – and accept it: Don’t be too proud to ask for help. Getting help can make a major difference in your life.
  3. Take care of yourself: Try to eat well, exercise regularly and visit your doctor when needed.
  4. Give yourself credit – not guilt: Make a list of all the things you are doing correctly and look at it frequently.
  5. Consult a geriatric care manager: Geriatric care managers are specialists who help families care for elderly relatives. They can provide valuable information and resources you will need to help you through these difficult times.
  6. Contact the Alzheimer’s Association for help: The Alzheimer’s Association (alz.org) has a 24/7 help line. Just call 1-800-272-3900.
  7. Contact the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America for help: This organization (alzfdn.org) has a help line operated between 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. Call 1-866-232-8484.
  8. Study and put into practice “The Caregiver’s Bill of Rights:” You can find this document here.
  9. See a psychotherapist: If your stress level is very high or if you are feeling depressed, a therapist might be able to help you.
  10. Consult with your spiritual leader: If you are a religious person your spiritual leader might also be able to help you.
  11. Join a support group: Support groups can be helpful for Alzheimer’s caregivers, even if you just listen in.
  12. See a family therapist if there is conflict in your family: If there is a lot of conflict among family members consider seeing a family therapist.
  13. Keep a journal: Writing about your experiences and feelings every day can also be therapeutic.
  14. Learn how to get along better with your loved one: Here are three quick tips: Don’t contradict or argue with them, Don’t bring up subjects that might upset them, and if they do get upset quickly change the subject. Following these tips will lead to a better relationship.
  15. Take up a hobby about which you become passionate. It’s important to have time to yourself. Find a hobby you love. It can make a big difference.

NOTE: A few of these tips are based on ones presented by the Alzheimer’s Association.

Need Advice This Very Minute? 2 Helplines You Can Call

Friday, December 5th, 2014

Here are two helplines you can call to get instant advice. (Please note, however, that you should call 911 for emergencies.)

The Alzheimer’s Association Hotline: 1-800-272-3900

Staff can answer questions, help you process your feelings, assist in problem solving and, when needed, link you to resources at your local Alzheimer’s Association. The Association stresses that you can call as often as needed.

The helpline serves people with memory loss, their family caregivers, health care professionals and the general public.

Visit the Alzheimer’s Association website (www.Alz.org) for further details.

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America Helpline: 1-866-232-8484

You can connect with this organization’s Master’s-level licensed social workers by calling the helpline. You can also connect by Skype, live chat or email. See the organization’s website (www.AlzFdn.org) for instructions on how to access each feature.

The team is available 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. At other times you can leave a voice message or send an email and a social worker will respond as soon as possible. No question is too small; no concern is too insignificant.

Like the Alzheimer’s Association, the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America assists people with memory loss themselves, their family caregivers, professional caregivers and the general public.

So the next time you need professional advice, call one of these respected helplines. You’ll be relieved you did.

Attending a Support Group Could Improve Your Quality of Life

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

What Is a Support Group? A support group is a regular meeting of people with the same illness or life situation (such as being a caregiver).

Support Group Formats: Some groups are structured and educational, bringing in speakers; in others the primary purpose is for members to share their feelings and experiences as well as give encouragement and practical advice to each other. Some groups meet in person, others meet online, and still others meet via phone.

Who Leads the Group? In some cases groups name their own leaders; other times a trained professional facilitates the meeting. Some Alzheimer’s caregiver groups provide free care for the person being cared for so that caregivers can be free to attend the meetings.

Meeting ‘Rules:’ The first is usually that any information shared is confidential. Secondly, only one person is allowed to talk at a time. Finally, members are instructed not to be judgmental. An additional rule for caregiver support groups is that the focus is on the caregiver – not the person being cared for.

General Benefits of Support Groups: It can be helpful just to talk with other people who are in the same situation you are in. Although some people may not feel like speaking up, according to an article on the Area Agency on Aging website, it can be helpful just to listen in.

Specific Benefits: According to a Mayo Clinic website article, some benefits of participating in support groups include:

–       Feeling less lonely, isolated or judged

–       Gaining a sense of empowerment and control

–       Improving your coping skills and sense of adjustment

–       Talking openly and honestly about your feelings

–       Reducing distress, depression or anxiety

–       Developing a clearer understanding of what to expect with your situation

–       Getting practical advice or information about treatment options

–       Comparing notes about resources, such as doctors and alternative options

How to Find a Support Group: To find a support group ask your doctor, check with your friends or acquaintances who are caregivers, or call your local Area Agency on Aging or your chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. You can also go to the Alzheimer’s Association website (alz.org) and search for a group near you or sign up for one of the online support groups the Association operates.

Is anyone attending a support group? If so, is it helpful to you?