Posts Tagged ‘death’

Moving on After the Death of a Loved One With Alzheimer’s

Saturday, July 12th, 2014

Grief must be fully experienced before you can move on. You need to allow yourself time to grieve. It’s important to take good care of yourself physically and emotionally during this time. It will also help to realize that with time your pain will lessen and you will be able to move on.

At some point – when you feel you’re ready – try to begin “returning to the world.” Take up a new hobby or go back to one that lapsed while you were caring for your loved one. Spend more time with the family members and friends you may have seen less in the preceding months or years. Some people also benefit from doing volunteer work.

Much to my surprise, one day I suddenly realized that I’d completely forgotten the third anniversary of Ed’s death a month earlier. That’s when I knew my grief was largely resolved.

 

Moving on After the Death of a Loved One With Alzheimer’s

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

Grief must be fully experienced before you can move on. You need to allow yourself time to grieve. It’s important to take good care of yourself physically and emotionally during this time. It will also help to realize that with time your pain will lessen and you will be able to move on.

At some point – when you feel you’re ready – try to begin “returning to the world.” Take up a new hobby or go back to one that lapsed while you were caring for your loved one. Spend more time with the family members and friends you may have seen less in the preceding months or years. Some people also benefit from doing volunteer work.

Much to my surprise, one day I suddenly realized that I’d completely forgotten the third anniversary of Ed’s death a month earlier. That’s when I knew my grief was largely resolved.

 

Preparing Emotionally for the End

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

There are many emotional issues facing family members and friends when a loved one is terminally ill. These include things such as communicating the terminal diagnosis to others; overcoming denial that the person is in fact terminally ill; feeling the need to “be strong” for that person’s benefit; dealing with anticipatory grief; and deciding when or if to engage hospice care services – just to name a few.

I want to share my experience near the end of Ed’s life. After I started hospice care for him I consulted Doug Smucker, MD, a family physician at the University of Cincinnati who specialized in end-of-life care.

After answering all my questions, he told me something that completely changed my thinking and feelings about the situation. He said that rather than focus on Ed’s impending death, I should focus on doing everything I could to help him have the highest possible quality of life in the time that was remaining.

That turned me around and led me to focus on all the special things I could do for Ed – visiting him more often, taking my little Shih Tzu to see him, having the violinist come back and play another concert for him, and buying him even more of the stuffed animals he loved so much. This helped both me and Ed have a beautiful, pleasant months-long conclusion of our life together

 

Hospice Care for People With Dementia

Saturday, September 22nd, 2012

It’s Not Just for Cancer Patients: When we think of hospice care we often associate it with cancer patients, but it’s also valuable for advanced stage Alzheimer’s patients. In that stage the person is unable to walk, dress or bathe without help; has trouble controlling urine and/or bowel functions; and only rarely speaks meaningful sentences.

More Specific Signs that You Should Consider Hospice Care: According to Gregg Warshaw, MD, Director of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Cincinnati and Past President of the American Geriatric Society, if your loved one with advanced Alzheimer’s is exhibiting any of the following symptoms, it’s time to talk to his or her doctor about considering hospice care:

1. Two or more episodes of pneumonia or other serious infections during the past 6-months

2. Difficulty eating and swallowing, even with feeding help, that results in weight loss of 10% or more over the preceding 6 months

3. One or more skin pressure ulcers that are not healing

Although starting hospice care for a loved one is a somber and painful experience, just remember it will help both you and your loved one have the highest possible quality of life during the precious time that is left.

Where to Find Additional Information: The Hospice Foundation of America is an excellent source for more information on this topic.

 

 

Preparing for Your Loved One’s Death: A Critical Piece of Advice

Saturday, August 11th, 2012

There are many emotional issues facing family members and friends when a loved one is terminally ill. These include things such as communicating the terminal diagnosis to others; overcoming denial that the person is in fact terminally ill; feeling the need to “be strong” for that person’s benefit; dealing with anticipatory grief; and deciding when or if to engage hospice care services – just to name a few.

I want to share my experience near the end of Ed’s life. After I started hospice care for him I consulted Doug Smucker, MD, a family physician at the University of Cincinnati who specialized in end-of-life care.

After answering all my questions, he told me something that completely changed my thinking and feelings about the situation. He said that rather than focus on Ed’s impending death, I should focus on doing everything I could to help him have the highest possible quality of life in the time that was remaining.

That turned me around and led me to focus on all the special things I could do for Ed – visiting him more often, taking my little Shih Tzu to see him, having the violinist come back and play another concert for him, and buying him even more of the stuffed animals he loved so much. This helped both me and Ed have a beautiful, pleasant months-long conclusion of our life together.

Three Myths About Alzheimer’s Disease

Thursday, May 31st, 2012

Myth 1: Memory loss is a natural part of aging. Reality: In the past people believed memory loss was a normal part of aging, often regarding even Alzheimer’s as natural age-related decline. Experts now recognize severe memory loss as a symptom of serious illness. Whether memory naturally declines to some extent is a research challenge still being addressed.

Myth 2: Alzheimer’s disease is not fatal. Reality: Alzheimer’s disease has no survivors. It destroys brain cells and causes memory changes, erratic behaviors and loss of body functions, and eventually leads to death.

Myth 3: Only older people can get Alzheimer’s. Reality: Alzheimer’s can strike people in their 50s, 40s or even 30s. This is called younger-onset Alzheimer’s. It’s estimated that there are as many as 200,000 people with Alzheimer’s in the US who are under age 65.

Adapted from: www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_myths_about_alzheimers.asp