Posts Tagged ‘book’

A Resource for You: Journey of a Lifetime

Friday, December 12th, 2014

The Journey of a Lifetime: The Caregiver’s Guide to Self-Care, by Jane Meier Hamilton, MSN, RN. Infinity. 2010. 129 pages. Available on www.Amazon.com.

Ms. Hamilton has been a psychiatric nurse for 35 years and a family caregiver for 20 years. For 8 of those years she cared for her mother, who had Alzheimer’s. She also founded a company called Partners on the Path (www.partnersonthepath.com).

Many helpful caregiver resources are included in this book. Each chapter presents: 1) A story from the author’s Alzheimer’s caregiving experience, 2) Practical self-care recommendations, 3) Suggested self-care activities, 4) Other caregiver resources, and 5) Inspiring quotes from authors, philosophers, and others. The book also includes questionnaires to help readers assess their caregiving experiences.

The nice things about this book are that it’s short, easy to read, and to the point. Also, it focuses on down-to-earth, practical strategies caregivers can immediately put into practice. This makes it a valuable resource for those who don’t have time to read long, complicated self-care manuals. I highly recommend this book to you.

 

A Valuable Resource for You: Tryn Rose Seley’s 15 Minutes of Fame

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

Tryn Rose Seley’s book, 15 Minutes of Fame, is a gold mine for caregivers of people with dementia. This brief and concise 35-page book has the subtitle One Photo Does Wonders to Bring You Both Back to Solid Ground. It is full of positive, practical and uplifting advice for enriching the lives of people with Alzheimer’s.

The book’s focus is “Empowering Caregivers of Those With Alzheimer’s.” It is intended to enable professional or family caregivers to entertain, engage and build trust with people who have dementia. The proposed approach is to share personal and meaningful stories, photos, songs and other materials with the person for at least 15 minutes per day.

According to Tryn Rose, “This improves daily mood, energy and hope for you and the one you care for. The ideas in the book,” she continues, “turn a stressful or ordinary day into an extraordinary one, sparking creativity and gratitude on this path of caregiving.”

The book contains numerous examples from the author’s experience as a caregiver. These illustrate how easy it is to implement the ideas advanced in the book.

Ms. Seley says it’s also important to leave stories and other materials in the person’s room (either at home or in a long-term care community) so that other caregivers or visitors can see and share them with the person. In this way a “circle of care” can be developed.

In conclusion, this is a wonderful, inspirational, and motivating book with clear and easy to follow strategies for transforming the days of people with dementia (or other special needs for that matter).

The book is available in Kindle format on Amazon.com. If you prefer a PDF, you may download it on the author’s website.

Note: Tryn Rose Seley is a professional caregiver, photographer, and a sought-after musician who makes presentations and offers workshops on various aspects of dementia for interested communities and organizations. You can email her at TrynRose@gmail.com and follow her on Twitter: @TrynRose.

 

 

Intensive Care for the Nurturer’s Soul: 7 Keys to Nurture Yourself While Caring for Others

Saturday, August 25th, 2012

Intensive Care for the Nurturer’s Soul: 7 Keys to Nurture Yourself While Caring for Others.  By Hueina Su, MS, BSN, CEC.  Published by RX for Balance Productions, 2009.  Available from Amazon.com.

Hueina Su, www.HueinaSu.com, is a registered nurse with more than 20 years of experience in nursing, coaching, counseling, speaking, training, nonprofit management and small business. She is from a Chinese family and is the fourth generation to work in the field of medicine.

Su’s approach is holistic and blends eastern and western philosophies, combined with real life stories, practical tips and self-coaching exercises. The book focuses on stress management and self nurturing.

One of the most important points Su makes about caregiving is that self-nurturing is not a luxury but a necessity if one is to care for others. She compares this to putting on your own oxygen mask in an airplane before putting on your child’s. If you don’t put on your own first you may pass out and not be able to help your child. This is a solid book on general stress management that could be helpful to those caring for people with Alzheimer’s.

 

 

 

I’m Planning a New Book

Sunday, July 8th, 2012

I think I have accidentally written a second book. I realized a few months ago that I’ve published over 50 articles online at the Huffington Post, The Alzheimer’s Reading Room and other sites, and that I could put them all together to come up with some sort of caregiver manual.

I have found a marvelous editor – Marjorie Rentz, MSW, who is with the Greater Cincinnati Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. Marjorie was my on-line caregiving coach when Ed had Alzheimer’s and we’ve stayed in touch. With her background in social work and all of her experience with Alzheimer’s disease, I couldn’t have found a better editor for my new book.

We’re just in the early stages of work. It’s going to be awhile before it’s out, but when we get closer to publication I’ll have a place on this website where you can pre-order copies.